Tag Archives: New research

Weakened code risks Australia’s reputation for research integrity

Written by David Vaux, Peter Brooks and Simon Gandevia. Originally published on The Conversation.  In 2018, Australia still does not have appropriate measures in place to maintain research integrity. And recent changes to our code of research conduct have weakened our already inadequate position. In contrast, China’s recent move to crack down on academic misconduct moves it into line with more than twenty European countries, […]

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New imaging technique will help understand muscle contracture after a stroke

Cutting-edge imaging technologies are being used to understand what causes muscle contracture after a stroke and how we can improve treatments. We believe a lot of fundamental questions about muscles have yet to be answered, but that may be about to change with the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI is an MRI-based imaging technique typically used to measure […]

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Like father… like son

Prof Rhoshel Lenroot is part of a large, multi-disciplinary team which seeks to improve the current treatments for children with conduct problems such as aggressive behaviours. Childhood conduct problems are the greatest risk factor for antisocial behaviour and violence, as well as later adult mental health issues. One of the most effective ways to treat early conduct problems is through […]

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Progesterone in MND and FTD

The role of progesterone, identified as a potential therapy for MND, is being investigated for FTD. Motor Neurone Disease (MND), also referred to as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) in some countries, is just one of the clinical syndromes associated with frontotemporal dementia or FTD. Others include corticobasal syndrome and progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome with a clinical variant of FTD being […]

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Dementia prevalence in Indigenous Australians

Prof Tony Broe and Dr Kylie Radford talk about their research into dementia prevalence in Australia’s indigenous population. One of our recent studies has shown that dementia prevalence in Indigenous Australians, aged over 60, is three times higher than the overall Australian population. What is it that helps one person age successfully and cause another to develop age-related diseases like […]

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Anxiety and depression: protection through resilience

Dr Justine Gatt is a Group Leader at NeuRA. She runs a research program in risk and resilience in mental health. Her research focuses on understanding the predictors of anxiety and depression risk, as well as the factors that promote resilience and wellbeing. It is hoped that these characteristics can be promoted in people who may be less resilient. In […]

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Creating resilience protects the future mental health of our children

Improving resilience and how children feel about themselves and others may have an important knock-on effect for their future mental health, especially if they experience psychotic-like symptoms. In the first study of its kind, our group of researchers are investigating how schematic beliefs – that is, beliefs formed early in life and shaped by childhood experience – may be associated […]

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Study: How to best manage the behavioural changes in frontotemporal dementia

Compared to Alzheimer’s disease, individuals diagnosed with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) tend to have worse behavioural symptoms and greater difficulties with their everyday activities, such as in organising household chores or putting on clean clothes each day. In addition, these individuals often lack insight into how their behaviours may impact others. These changes are difficult to manage and are a frequent […]

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Teasing apart the spectrum of diseases

Can a simple rating scale discriminate between two debilitating diseases? What if you were told that you had Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)? How about Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD)? Would you know what that meant for you? Would you know the difference? These are the questions that continually plague doctors and researchers, because the reality is in some cases there is no […]

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