Category Archives: Science communication

Progressive research is offering new hope across all ages

The most important investment in our country, from both a social and economic perspective, is in the well-being of its citizens through health and medical research. Tackling the growing impact of mental illness is imperative, and given our ageing population, the neurodegenerative conditions mean that over 350,000 Australians are living with dementia. This requires a sustained and comprehensive commitment from […]

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Dementia prevalence in Indigenous Australians

On this, the United Nations’ International Day of the World’s Indigenous People, Prof Tony Broe and Dr Kylie Radford talk about their research into dementia prevalence in Australia’s indigenous population. One of our recent studies has shown that dementia prevalence in Indigenous Australians, aged over 60, is three times higher than the overall Australian population. What is it that helps […]

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Fight, flight or … faint? Why some people pass out when they see blood or feel pain

Most people find the sight of blood or a hypodermic needle enough to cause some discomfort, but why do some people faint when faced with them? If you’re someone who finds yourself sweating about your upcoming flu jab, you might have your prehistoric ancestors to thank. Phobias are part of the anxiety disorder family. They are thought to arise because […]

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NEURA MAGAZINE #16 IS OUT!

The Autumn 2016 edition of the NeuRA Magazine is ready to read! This quarter, we discuss with Prof Rhoshel Lenroot how fathers can help future generations in Like Father Like Son. You can also read about Leanne O’Reilly’s participation in the CATS study with the schizophrenia laboratory. And catch up with Dr Claire Shepherd, Manager of the Sydney Brain Bank […]

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What is acceptance of pain and why would anyone want it?

Greater acceptance of chronic pain is associated with fewer pain-related difficulties, such as distress and disability, and better quality of life. Pragmatically, however, the idea that one might want to be more “accepting” of chronic pain runs contrary to common sense. To help clarify this confusion the McAuley Group, which researches low back pain at NeuRA, is proud to be […]

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The difference between the dementias

The number of Australians with dementia is predicted to grow to more than one million people in the next 40 years. NeuRA researcher Professor Glenda Halliday believes we’re in a better position than ever before to discover how to diagnose the many different dementias and reduce the number of people who will be affected in the future. With more than […]

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A step forward in understanding hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus is a devastating structural neurological disorder marked by enlarged brain ventricles due to accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid. The current diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is inadequate due to a lack of understanding about the mechanisms behind its development. Hydrocephalus may be accompanied by low intracranial pressure and it continues to remain a clinical challenge to differentiate this disease with […]

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The Winter edition of the NeuRA Magazine is out!

Read the latest edition of our NeuRA Magazine – online version here… In this edition, we feature an article on The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), an international research partnership determined to defeat Alzheimer’s disease, and our first clinical trial participant, Amanda Ayliffe. You can also read about a recent study by NeuRA’s Prof Stephen Lord and Dr Phu Hoang […]

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