Public neuroscience

Neuroscience is nearly everywhere, and in places where it isn’t, it should be. NeuRA is committed to communicating its research findings and the implications of these findings to a broad audience. We all have a brain and a nervous system collecting sensory input, controlling our breathing, beating our heart, coordinating our muscles, telling our face when to smile. 

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How does having dementia affect everyday activities?

A NeuRA study recently investigated how different types of dementia affect the ability to perform everyday tasks. The focus was on progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA) and logopenic nonfluent aphasia (LPA) – two dementias that lead to similar problems in language (at least to the untrained ear, not so according to specific language tests). Under the microscope these dementias look very different: […]

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‘Exergaming’ – The new way for older Australians to keep fit

Insufficient levels of physical activity in adult Australians are increasing. In 2007 and 2008, approximately 62% of adults did not meet recommended ‘moderate’ physical activity guidelines. Strength, mobility, aerobic capacity, energy, anxiety, depression and reduction in fall risk in older populations have been shown to improve following increased physical activity interventions. Additionally, there are recently published findings suggesting high levels […]

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Busy bee visits NeuRA

NeuRA was lucky enough to host one of Australia’s brainiest teenagers, Uma Jha, when she visited last week for a work experience placement. At just 14, the Perth native beat 3000 hopefuls to become the champion of the 2009 Australian ‘Brain Bee’; a neuroscience competition. As the sole representative of Australia, Uma continued to the international Brain Bee championships in […]

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