Tag Archives: neuroscience

Creating resilience protects the future mental health of our children

Improving resilience and how children feel about themselves and others may have an important knock-on effect for their future mental health, especially if they experience psychotic-like symptoms. In the first study of its kind, our group of researchers are investigating how schematic beliefs – that is, beliefs formed early in life and shaped by childhood experience – may be associated […]

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Multiple system atrophy – the cousin of Parkinson’s disease

“He didn’t want the kids to think he was drunk, so he stopped coming to their soccer practice and games.” George’s family knew then… something wasn’t right. When you think of your family and friends, who is the person always up for a laugh or always greets you with a warm embrace? For the Kostakis family and their friends, George […]

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Fight, flight or … faint? Why some people pass out when they see blood or feel pain

Most people find the sight of blood or a hypodermic needle enough to cause some discomfort, but why do some people faint when faced with them? If you’re someone who finds yourself sweating about your upcoming flu jab, you might have your prehistoric ancestors to thank. Phobias are part of the anxiety disorder family. They are thought to arise because […]

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The caregiver burden

It is well known that dementia causes distress, however, little research has been done to understand caregiver stress and how it differs within the dementias. Prof John Hodges and his team are investigating caregiver distress among people caring for those with dementia and combining it with information from patients, to better understand which aspects of the condition are creating more […]

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How often do you stop and think about it?

To think of thinking seems like a peculiar task. For most of us, thinking occurs constantly despite rarely giving it a thought. However, as Jess Hazelton discusses below, when we take a few moments and evaluate what our brain is capable of, it is truly astounding! Acting as a control centre for our entire body, we can understand our brain […]

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The difference between the dementias

The number of Australians with dementia is predicted to grow to more than one million people in the next 40 years. NeuRA researcher Professor Glenda Halliday believes we’re in a better position than ever before to discover how to diagnose the many different dementias and reduce the number of people who will be affected in the future. With more than […]

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Guiding future research

Our scientists have been asked to compile a special edition of Schizophrenia Research, looking specifically at the hormones implicated in the disorder. The September issue of peer-reviewed journal Schizophrenia Research, will this year be guest-edited by Prof Cyndi Shannon Weickert with assistance from myself and Katie Allen (right). We were invited to bring together a collection of articles that examine […]

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Lost in the landscape of the brain? Get out the atlas

This article originally appeared on The Brain Dialogue. Suzanne Shubart. Now brain travellers can track their explorations with highly-detailed maps created with state-of-the-art imaging technology. The Big Picture You’re lost in the desert and, after wandering for days, in the distance you spot a giant red rock jutting out of the barren landscape. Had you never encountered this landmark before […]

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