Tag Archives: neuroscience

Progressive research is offering new hope across all ages

The most important investment in our country, from both a social and economic perspective, is in the well-being of its citizens through health and medical research. Tackling the growing impact of mental illness is imperative, and given our ageing population, the neurodegenerative conditions mean that over 350,000 Australians are living with dementia. This requires a sustained and comprehensive commitment from […]

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Dementia prevalence in Indigenous Australians

On this, the United Nations’ International Day of the World’s Indigenous People, Prof Tony Broe and Dr Kylie Radford talk about their research into dementia prevalence in Australia’s indigenous population. One of our recent studies has shown that dementia prevalence in Indigenous Australians, aged over 60, is three times higher than the overall Australian population. What is it that helps […]

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Anxiety and depression: protection through resilience

This article was posted in support of Homeless Persons’ Week 2016, for which traumatic life experiences and mental health problems are one of the major risk factors. Dr Justine Gatt is a Group Leader at NeuRA. She runs a research program in risk and resilience in mental health. Her research focuses on understanding the predictors of anxiety and depression risk, […]

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Creating resilience protects the future mental health of our children

Improving resilience and how children feel about themselves and others may have an important knock-on effect for their future mental health, especially if they experience psychotic-like symptoms. In the first study of its kind, our group of researchers are investigating how schematic beliefs – that is, beliefs formed early in life and shaped by childhood experience – may be associated […]

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Multiple system atrophy – the cousin of Parkinson’s disease

“He didn’t want the kids to think he was drunk, so he stopped coming to their soccer practice and games.” George’s family knew then… something wasn’t right. When you think of your family and friends, who is the person always up for a laugh or always greets you with a warm embrace? For the Kostakis family and their friends, George […]

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Fight, flight or … faint? Why some people pass out when they see blood or feel pain

Most people find the sight of blood or a hypodermic needle enough to cause some discomfort, but why do some people faint when faced with them? If you’re someone who finds yourself sweating about your upcoming flu jab, you might have your prehistoric ancestors to thank. Phobias are part of the anxiety disorder family. They are thought to arise because […]

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The caregiver burden

It is well known that dementia causes distress, however, little research has been done to understand caregiver stress and how it differs within the dementias. Prof John Hodges and his team are investigating caregiver distress among people caring for those with dementia and combining it with information from patients, to better understand which aspects of the condition are creating more […]

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How often do you stop and think about it?

To think of thinking seems like a peculiar task. For most of us, thinking occurs constantly despite rarely giving it a thought. However, as Jess Hazelton discusses below, when we take a few moments and evaluate what our brain is capable of, it is truly astounding! Acting as a control centre for our entire body, we can understand our brain […]

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