Multiple system atrophy – the cousin of Parkinson’s disease

“He didn’t want the kids to think he was drunk, so he stopped coming to their soccer practice and games.” George’s family knew then… something wasn’t right. When you think of your family and friends, who is the person always up for a laugh or always greets you with a warm embrace? For the Kostakis family and their friends, George […]

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Our progressive research offers new hope across all ages

The most important investment in our country, from both a social and economic perspective, is in the well-being of its citizens through health and medical research. Tackling the growing impact of mental illness is imperative, and given our ageing population, the neurodegenerative conditions mean that over 350,000 Australians are living with dementia. This requires a sustained and comprehensive commitment from […]

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Fight, flight or … faint? Why some people pass out when they see blood or feel pain

Most people find the sight of blood or a hypodermic needle enough to cause some discomfort, but why do some people faint when faced with them? If you’re someone who finds yourself sweating about your upcoming flu jab, you might have your prehistoric ancestors to thank. Phobias are part of the anxiety disorder family. They are thought to arise because […]

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The caregiver burden

It is well known that dementia causes distress, however, little research has been done to understand caregiver stress and how it differs within the dementias. Prof John Hodges and his team are investigating caregiver distress among people caring for those with dementia and combining it with information from patients, to better understand which aspects of the condition are creating more […]

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World Autism Awareness Day

The United Nations World Autism Awareness Day is 2ndApril. This year, the agenda is “Inclusion and Neurodiversity”, chosen to highlight the need to make sure individuals with autism are fully included in society, and recognized as members of the great diversity of humankind, with their own unique and important contributions. The notion of diversity brings up the question of how […]

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NEURA MAGAZINE #16 IS OUT!

The Autumn 2016 edition of the NeuRA Magazine is ready to read! This quarter, we discuss with Prof Rhoshel Lenroot how fathers can help future generations in Like Father Like Son. You can also read about Leanne O’Reilly’s participation in the CATS study with the schizophrenia laboratory. And catch up with Dr Claire Shepherd, Manager of the Sydney Brain Bank […]

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How often do you stop and think about it?

To think of thinking seems like a peculiar task. For most of us, thinking occurs constantly despite rarely giving it a thought. However, as Jess Hazelton discusses below, when we take a few moments and evaluate what our brain is capable of, it is truly astounding! Acting as a control centre for our entire body, we can understand our brain […]

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Things happen for a reason – how reaching for opportunities led me to my PhD at NeuRA

Trinidad Valenzuela has come to NeuRA from Chile to complete her PhD by exploring ways to improve falls prevention exercise programs for older people. This is her story… I believe everyone is surrounded by opportunities. I like to think of it as one of those Christmas snow globes. Imagine you are inside, and all the tiny snowflakes moving around you […]

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