What is acceptance of pain and why would anyone want it?

Greater acceptance of chronic pain is associated with fewer pain-related difficulties, such as distress and disability, and better quality of life. Pragmatically, however, the idea that one might want to be more “accepting” of chronic pain runs contrary to common sense. To help clarify this confusion the McAuley Group, which researches low back pain at NeuRA, is proud to be […]

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Volunteer for schizophrenia clinical trial

Volunteer call out: Canakinumab adjunctive treatment to reduce symptoms and improve cognition in people with schizophrenia displaying elevated blood inflammatory markers What is the purpose of the study? You are invited to participate in a research study of a human immune cell-line antibody upon language, memory, and symptoms of schizophrenia. This human immune cell-line antibody, canakinumab, is a class of […]

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Everything our body does requires muscles, a brain and nerves

NeuRA’s Motor Impairment Group investigates this system and why it fails. The Motor Impairment Program is a five-year (2014-2018), NHMRC-funded grant, the goal of which is to better understand the pathophysiology of motor impairment, to implement interventions and to drive enhanced clinical practice. Following are highlights of the 2015 year. NeuRA’s Motor Impairment Research Program conducted a randomised controlled trial […]

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OSA tied to increased health risks

Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep apnoea and is caused by obstruction of the upper airway. What we know about OSA involves repeated episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. Common symptoms of OSA are excessive daytime sleepiness, snoring, waking unrefreshed, and waking during the night choking or gasping for air. OSA occurs in at […]

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The difference between the dementias

The number of Australians with dementia is predicted to grow to more than one million people in the next 40 years. NeuRA researcher Professor Glenda Halliday believes we’re in a better position than ever before to discover how to diagnose the many different dementias and reduce the number of people who will be affected in the future. With more than […]

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Shining a light on brain activity in toddlers with autism

Using fNIRS opens doors and provides new opportunities for studying brain activity that was not previously possible. Autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, is a complex developmental disability; signs typically appear during early childhood and affect the ability to communicate and interact with others. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and early diagnosis and intervention lead […]

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Meet the researcher – Juan Olaya

What leads to someone taking up a neuroscience degree and studying the causes of schizophrenia? Read on to find out about Juan Olaya‘s story. Although I started my degree in psychology, it was a neuroscience unit that led me to become interested in understanding the possible causes of schizophrenia. What I found really interesting was what causes mental illness to […]

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Doctors call for action on child motorcycle and quad deaths

Doctors are calling for children who ride motorbikes, quads and other off road vehicles to participate in a new study aimed at preventing crashes and serious injury. The research follows on from a recent Queensland Coroner’s findings into quad bike deaths, which highlighted the potential risks of children riding motorbikes and quads. Injuries kill more children in Australia than any […]

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