Category Archives: Research

What is acceptance of pain and why would anyone want it?

Greater acceptance of chronic pain is associated with fewer pain-related difficulties, such as distress and disability, and better quality of life. Pragmatically, however, the idea that one might want to be more “accepting” of chronic pain runs contrary to common sense. To help clarify this confusion the McAuley Group, which researches low back pain at NeuRA, is proud to be […]

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The difference between the dementias

The number of Australians with dementia is predicted to grow to more than one million people in the next 40 years. NeuRA researcher Professor Glenda Halliday believes we’re in a better position than ever before to discover how to diagnose the many different dementias and reduce the number of people who will be affected in the future. With more than […]

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Shining a light on brain activity in toddlers with autism

Using fNIRS opens doors and provides new opportunities for studying brain activity that was not previously possible. Autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, is a complex developmental disability; signs typically appear during early childhood and affect the ability to communicate and interact with others. There is no known single cause of autism, but increased awareness and early diagnosis and intervention lead […]

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Lost in the landscape of the brain? Get out the atlas

This article originally appeared on The Brain Dialogue. Suzanne Shubart. Now brain travellers can track their explorations with highly-detailed maps created with state-of-the-art imaging technology. The Big Picture You’re lost in the desert and, after wandering for days, in the distance you spot a giant red rock jutting out of the barren landscape. Had you never encountered this landmark before […]

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In memory of Ella

The NeuRA Memory Cycle Challenge appealed to me because I felt it ticked a number of boxes. I needed a new “project” as my son had finished school the previous year, I was looking for the motivation to increase my fitness and, as a very occasional cyclist, I thought this would be a great way to see a country. My […]

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Growing a community of early career researchers

Jessica Lazarus, PhD candidate and 2014-2015 Co-Chair of the NeuRA Early Career Committee, enthuses about research, networking, and building professional skills. I began my PhD at NeuRA in March 2014 after finishing a Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours) at the University of New South Wales. My current research focuses on the potential role that epigenetic modification plays in extreme longevity. […]

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Eating and metabolism in frontotemporal dementia

When thinking about frontotemporal dementia, we often focus on cognitive and behavioural symptoms. Memory loss, personality changes, and trouble speaking and understanding language are among some of the more recognised FTD symptoms. However, there is a physical side to neurodegenerative illnesses that is the subject of Dr Rebekah Ahmed’s research at NeuRA. Eating abnormalities are present in 6 out of […]

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Targetting the impact of HAND

HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a major neurological complication in HIV-positive persons. It impairs cognitive activity, including memory, learning, attention, problem solving and decision making. Symptoms can vary from confusion to forgetfulness, behavioural changes, nerve pain and sometimes apathy. The widespread use of combined antiretroviral treatment has reduced the incidence of the most severe form of the disorder, HIV-associated dementia, […]

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